Climbing in the Moroccan Anti-Atlas

Morocco had never been a country I longed to visit, until I actually went there.

On arriving in Marrakesh, the classic hustle and bustle became quickly apparent. The taxi ride into the old town miraculously dropped us off very close to our accommodation, from where we were coincidentally met a man who worked there. We were greeted with mint tea and delicious toasted sweet fennel bread, settled in and set off to explore the streets and find some dinner.

The next day we managed to get back to the airport, hire a car and drive south. The terrain outside Marrakesh was flat and featureless, but became more mountainous as we reached our destination for the night, the Kasbah de Tizourgane.

Morning at the Kasbah de Tizourgane
Morning at the Kasbah de Tizourgane

We arrived after the sun had set, giving a more adventurous feel to the steep dirt track up to the gates. However, once our bags were hauled up to the reception in a luggage lift and we were led through the cosy corridors, it was clear we had found a comfortable place to rest. A warm but calm greeting that felt a world away from Marrakesh preceded a delicious meal and sleep. The place seemed to be patronised largely by climbers of varying European origin. We decided to stay here a while.

Approaching Adrar Iffran
Approaching Adrar Iffran

Our first task the following day was to stock up on food and water. Once done, we were able to walk in to wrong crag, giving us a grand and adventurous approach to the south west face of Adrar Iffran, where we managed to get in a 3 pitch VS route to get a feel for the rock. It was at the top of this climb as the sun was setting that it dawned on me how beautiful this landscape could be, that had previously held no appeal. As we descended, the peace and stillness was only broken by the call to prayer resonating around the valley. We arrived back at the car as the light faded and made our way back to the Kasbah.

Sunset at Adrar Iffran
Sunset at Adrar Iffran

The following day we set off to the Samazar valley, our objective lying an hour driving up and down a rough and rocky dirt track. The Hyundai i10 was truly in its element. After a very short walk we found ourselves at the foot of our route, the central buttress of Knight’s Peak, a subsidiary summit of Aylim, The Great Rock. For nearly 500 metres we worked our way up pinnacles, ridges and faces, culminating in the cracked pillar, a battle of an overhanging crack.

Topping out on Knight's Peak
Topping out on Knight’s Peak

Topping out on this outstanding route, the descent lay before us, which turned into the crux of the day; a carpet of thick, thorny undergrowth which lined the valley between us and the car. After a few errors we eventually reached more amenable terraces and the dry riverbed that was the return path.

Finding a way down through the dense spiky undergrowth
Finding a way down through the dense spiky undergrowth

We managed to fit some other climbing in, then the weather deteriorated for a day or two, turning the quartzite rock instantly slick with the first small drops of rain.

Samazar valley view
Samazar valley view

With a new day came better weather and renewed enthusiasm for climbing. We headed towards Tafraout and the Lion’s Face. The approach to this crag is a fairly involved affair through a complex system of gorges.

On the approach to the Lion's Face
On the approach to the Lion’s Face

Our ascent was a combination of following the most natural line and occasional consultation of the guidebook description. The route featured big exposure and sparse gear for protection, but always with good holds. There were frequent patches of loose rock which added to the adventurous feel of the route.

Eventually reaching the ridge which led to the summit, we moved together to the top with an incredible light display unfolding around us.

Descent from Lion's Face
Descent from Lion’s Face

The guidebook struck again on the descent, seeming to avoid using any obvious features of the terrain. A good path became obvious and we found our way down through more spectacular scenery back into the gorge and to the car, just as the last light of the day was fading.

We finished the trip with a night in the beach town of Taghazout, something a little different to end the trip.

The sea at Taghazout
The sea at Taghazout